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Others apple question

How to Restart your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch?

iPhonehowapple Published the article • 0 comments • 1075 views • 2016-05-10 10:42 • May belong to these tags

Follow the steps to restart your device.
How to restart
 





Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the red slider appears.
Drag the slider to turn your device completely off.
After the device turns off, press and hold the Sleep/Wake button again until you see the Apple logo.

How to force restart




You should force restart your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch as a last resort, and only if it's not responding. To force restart your device, press and hold both the Sleep/Wake and Home buttons for at least ten seconds, until you see the Apple logo. Show all
Follow the steps to restart your device.
How to restart
 
Screen_Shot_2016-05-10_at_10.43_.36_.png


Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the red slider appears.
Drag the slider to turn your device completely off.
After the device turns off, press and hold the Sleep/Wake button again until you see the Apple logo.

How to force restart
iphone6_hands_reset.png

You should force restart your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch as a last resort, and only if it's not responding. To force restart your device, press and hold both the Sleep/Wake and Home buttons for at least ten seconds, until you see the Apple logo.

iMessage not syncing between iPad and iPhone?

iPhonehowapple Replyed • 2 subscribed • 1 replies • 1331 views • 2016-05-09 12:27 • May belong to these tags

Can I create and save word documents an presentations to a flash drive off the iPad mini?

iPadhowapple Replyed • 2 subscribed • 1 replies • 809 views • 2016-05-09 12:25 • May belong to these tags

How to Access Files in iPhoto?

NoteBookshowapple Published the article • 0 comments • 855 views • 2016-05-09 01:05 • May belong to these tags

If you're new to iPhoto it can be a litle confusing. You may be used to organising files in folders on your Hard Drive. This is a perfectly good way to organise files but pretty hopeless for organising Photos.

 

Remember that file is just a container -  a box - for your Photograph. Think of it this way:  In my iTunes Library I have a file called 'Let_it_Be_The_Beatles.mp3'. So what is that, exactly? It's not the song. The Beatles never wrote an mp3. They wrote a tune and lyrics. They recorded it and a copy of that recording is stored in the mp3 file. So the file is just a container for the recording. That container is designed in a specific way attuned to the characteristics and requirements of the data. Hence, mp3.

 

Similarly, that Jpeg is not your photo, it's a container designed to hold that kind of data. iPhoto is all about the data and not about the container. So, regardless of where you choose to store the file, iPhoto will manage the photo, edit the photo, add metadata to the Photo but never touch the file. If you choose to export - unless you specifically choose to export the original - iPhoto will export the Photo into a new container - a new file containing the photo.

There are times when you need to get to a photo ouside of iPhoto - to upload, to share, to add to a document for instance.

There are many, many ways to access your files in iPhoto:   You can use any Open / Attach / Browse dialogue. On the left there's a Media heading, your pics can be accessed there. Command-Click for selecting multiple pics.
\
It looks a little different in 10.10 Yosemite:

(Note the above illustration is not a Finder Window. It's the dialogue you get when you go File -> Open)
You can access the Library from the New Message Window in Mail:

  Show all
If you're new to iPhoto it can be a litle confusing. You may be used to organising files in folders on your Hard Drive. This is a perfectly good way to organise files but pretty hopeless for organising Photos.

 

Remember that file is just a container -  a box - for your Photograph. Think of it this way:  In my iTunes Library I have a file called 'Let_it_Be_The_Beatles.mp3'. So what is that, exactly? It's not the song. The Beatles never wrote an mp3. They wrote a tune and lyrics. They recorded it and a copy of that recording is stored in the mp3 file. So the file is just a container for the recording. That container is designed in a specific way attuned to the characteristics and requirements of the data. Hence, mp3.

 

Similarly, that Jpeg is not your photo, it's a container designed to hold that kind of data. iPhoto is all about the data and not about the container. So, regardless of where you choose to store the file, iPhoto will manage the photo, edit the photo, add metadata to the Photo but never touch the file. If you choose to export - unless you specifically choose to export the original - iPhoto will export the Photo into a new container - a new file containing the photo.

There are times when you need to get to a photo ouside of iPhoto - to upload, to share, to add to a document for instance.

There are many, many ways to access your files in iPhoto:   You can use any Open / Attach / Browse dialogue. On the left there's a Media heading, your pics can be accessed there. Command-Click for selecting multiple pics.
\
It looks a little different in 10.10 Yosemite:

(Note the above illustration is not a Finder Window. It's the dialogue you get when you go File -> Open)
You can access the Library from the New Message Window in Mail:

 

How do I access my Photos in Aperture?

NoteBookshowapple Published the article • 0 comments • 783 views • 2016-05-09 01:03 • May belong to these tags

How do I access my Photos in Aperture?
If you're new to Aperture it can be a little confusing. You may be used to organising files in folders on your Hard Drive. This is a perfectly good way to organise files but limited for organising Photos.

 

Remember that file is just a container -  a box - for your Photograph. Think of it this way:  In my iTunes Library I have a file called 'Let_it_Be_The_Beatles.mp3'. So what is that, exactly? It's not the song. The Beatles never wrote an mp3. They wrote a tune and lyrics. They recorded it and a copy of that recording is stored in the mp3 file. So the file is just a container for the recording. That container is designed in a specific way attuned to the characteristics and requirements of the data. Hence, mp3.

 

Similarly, that Jpeg or Raw is not your photo, it's a container designed to hold that kind of data. Aperture is all about the data and not about the container. What does that mean? Essentially, it means that (regardless of where you choose to store the master file) Aperture will manage the photo, edit the photo, add metadata to the Photo but never touch that file.  If you choose to export - unless you specifically choose to export the original - Aperture will export the Photo into a new container - a new file containing the photo.

 

There are times when you need to get to a photo outside of Aperture - to upload, to share, to add to a document for instance.

 

There are many, many ways to access your photos that are managed by Aperture. Which to use depends on the purpose you have for the image. In general there are two main ways: Media Browsers and Exporting.

 

Media Browsers

 

Media Browsers are all through the OS. They're in every Open... Attach... or Browse... dialogue, they're built into the tool bars of apps like Pages, iMovie, Final Cut X, Word, Mail and so on. Media Browsers access your Aperture Preview.

 

 

Note: That is not a Finder window. It's the dialogue you get when you go File -> Open... in an app...

 

 

Here's the Media Browser from mail

 

 

 

Note that the entire Library is available, note too the search box at the bottom which can be use to search on any text - titles, keywords etc -

 

The Media Browser yields your Aperture Previews. The quality of these can vary depending on the settings you choose in the Aperture Preferences. You must also elect to share the Previews with the iLife apps for the Media Browser to work.

 

There are limitations. There is no way to access a Raw file via Media Browsers, they are always jpeg, they have limited support for Exif and IPTC and so on.

 

Common uses for the Media Browser: when you need to use a shot in a word processing document, in a movie or for a handy email of a shot to family or friends.

 

Note: Drag and drop (or Copy and Paste) from the Aperture Window also gets the Aperture Previews.


 

Exporting

 

 

There is a whole chapter in the manual on Exporting so I'm not going to recap that here. But there are some headlines to note, and common causes of confusion.

 

 

You can access the Export options by selecting a shot or shots and going File -> Export

 

 

You can export the Original file - that's the Raw if you're shooting Raw, or the unedited Jpeg. Basically, this is how you get out exactly what you put into Aperture.

 

 

You can export versions. These are your processed or edited shots. Have a look at the shot below

 

 

There are a lot of options. You can export to Jpeg, Tiff, PNG or PSD, in a variety of sizes and qualities, including metadata or not as you prefer. You can use the existing export presets or, at the bottom of the list you'll see the Edit... option. This allows you to create your own preset. So, if you regularly export to low quality Jpeg at 75% of the size, you can create and name a preset, and save it.

 

For instance, in the shot above you'll see the chosen preset happens to be JPEG-Rett Site - which is a created preset for a specific purpose.

 

 

Some common confusions:

 

Size refers to dimensions - length by breadth. So, a Jpeg at Original size will not have the same file size (or 'weight') in MB or KB as the original. It will be the same dimensions are the original, measured in pixels.

 

 

The File Size (or 'weight') in MB or KB is determined by the Image Quality - and that's an option you set in when you choose (or create) the export preset.

 

For more: RTFM - which stands for 'Read the FREE Manual'. 

 

You can view the free manual online here

 

http://documentation.apple.com ... nual/

 

and download it as a pdf from here

 

http://documentation.apple.com ... 0Manu al%20(en).pdf Show all
How do I access my Photos in Aperture?
If you're new to Aperture it can be a little confusing. You may be used to organising files in folders on your Hard Drive. This is a perfectly good way to organise files but limited for organising Photos.

 

Remember that file is just a container -  a box - for your Photograph. Think of it this way:  In my iTunes Library I have a file called 'Let_it_Be_The_Beatles.mp3'. So what is that, exactly? It's not the song. The Beatles never wrote an mp3. They wrote a tune and lyrics. They recorded it and a copy of that recording is stored in the mp3 file. So the file is just a container for the recording. That container is designed in a specific way attuned to the characteristics and requirements of the data. Hence, mp3.

 

Similarly, that Jpeg or Raw is not your photo, it's a container designed to hold that kind of data. Aperture is all about the data and not about the container. What does that mean? Essentially, it means that (regardless of where you choose to store the master file) Aperture will manage the photo, edit the photo, add metadata to the Photo but never touch that file.  If you choose to export - unless you specifically choose to export the original - Aperture will export the Photo into a new container - a new file containing the photo.

 

There are times when you need to get to a photo outside of Aperture - to upload, to share, to add to a document for instance.

 

There are many, many ways to access your photos that are managed by Aperture. Which to use depends on the purpose you have for the image. In general there are two main ways: Media Browsers and Exporting.

 

Media Browsers

 

Media Browsers are all through the OS. They're in every Open... Attach... or Browse... dialogue, they're built into the tool bars of apps like Pages, iMovie, Final Cut X, Word, Mail and so on. Media Browsers access your Aperture Preview.

 

 

Note: That is not a Finder window. It's the dialogue you get when you go File -> Open... in an app...

 

 

Here's the Media Browser from mail

 

 

 

Note that the entire Library is available, note too the search box at the bottom which can be use to search on any text - titles, keywords etc -

 

The Media Browser yields your Aperture Previews. The quality of these can vary depending on the settings you choose in the Aperture Preferences. You must also elect to share the Previews with the iLife apps for the Media Browser to work.

 

There are limitations. There is no way to access a Raw file via Media Browsers, they are always jpeg, they have limited support for Exif and IPTC and so on.

 

Common uses for the Media Browser: when you need to use a shot in a word processing document, in a movie or for a handy email of a shot to family or friends.

 

Note: Drag and drop (or Copy and Paste) from the Aperture Window also gets the Aperture Previews.


 

Exporting

 

 

There is a whole chapter in the manual on Exporting so I'm not going to recap that here. But there are some headlines to note, and common causes of confusion.

 

 

You can access the Export options by selecting a shot or shots and going File -> Export

 

 

You can export the Original file - that's the Raw if you're shooting Raw, or the unedited Jpeg. Basically, this is how you get out exactly what you put into Aperture.

 

 

You can export versions. These are your processed or edited shots. Have a look at the shot below

 

 

There are a lot of options. You can export to Jpeg, Tiff, PNG or PSD, in a variety of sizes and qualities, including metadata or not as you prefer. You can use the existing export presets or, at the bottom of the list you'll see the Edit... option. This allows you to create your own preset. So, if you regularly export to low quality Jpeg at 75% of the size, you can create and name a preset, and save it.

 

For instance, in the shot above you'll see the chosen preset happens to be JPEG-Rett Site - which is a created preset for a specific purpose.

 

 

Some common confusions:

 

Size refers to dimensions - length by breadth. So, a Jpeg at Original size will not have the same file size (or 'weight') in MB or KB as the original. It will be the same dimensions are the original, measured in pixels.

 

 

The File Size (or 'weight') in MB or KB is determined by the Image Quality - and that's an option you set in when you choose (or create) the export preset.

 

For more: RTFM - which stands for 'Read the FREE Manual'. 

 

You can view the free manual online here

 

http://documentation.apple.com ... nual/

 

and download it as a pdf from here

 

http://documentation.apple.com ... 0Manu al%20(en).pdf

How to deal with the "Activation Server Unavailable" error message when restoring an iOS device

iMachowapple Published the article • 0 comments • 772 views • 2016-05-09 01:01 • May belong to these tags

Here are the reasons you might get the message that the Activation Server is unavailable:
It really is unavailable. Rare, but it happens. You can check its status here: https://www.apple.com/support/systemstatus/Your antivirus or firewall is blocking access to gs.apple.com. Try temporarily disabling it.Your router's firewall is blocking access to gs.apple.com or to a port that it requires (443).Your phone is jailbroken, or it was at some time in the past.Your computer was used to hack or jailbreak some iOS device in the past (not necessarily the device with the current problem), and its network database was corrupted. Hacking includes using some questionable apps such as recboot, reiboot, Tinyumbrella, redsn0w, etc.
For the last possibility inspect your computer's hosts file. If there are any lines in the file that reference gs.apple.com, that is the explanation. You will need to rebuild the hosts file without those lines. Show all
Here are the reasons you might get the message that the Activation Server is unavailable:
  • It really is unavailable. Rare, but it happens. You can check its status here: https://www.apple.com/support/systemstatus/
  • Your antivirus or firewall is blocking access to gs.apple.com. Try temporarily disabling it.
  • Your router's firewall is blocking access to gs.apple.com or to a port that it requires (443).
  • Your phone is jailbroken, or it was at some time in the past.
  • Your computer was used to hack or jailbreak some iOS device in the past (not necessarily the device with the current problem), and its network database was corrupted. Hacking includes using some questionable apps such as recboot, reiboot, Tinyumbrella, redsn0w, etc.

For the last possibility inspect your computer's hosts file. If there are any lines in the file that reference gs.apple.com, that is the explanation. You will need to rebuild the hosts file without those lines.

When to charge your iPhone or iPad?

iPadhowapple Published the article • 0 comments • 736 views • 2016-05-09 00:59 • May belong to these tags

There's a lot of myth and folklore surrounding charging iOS devices (or actually any device that uses Lithium technology batteries). A lot of it comes from the advice given for older technologies, such as Nickel-Cadmium or Nickel-Metal-Hydride batteries. None of this applies to Lithium, however, and some of what we "know" from the NiCd and NiMH days is actually harmful to modern battery technology.
Things to understand:
The "charger" for an iOS device is built into the device. It is not the thingy that plugs into the wall, and it is not the cable that connects the thingy that plugs into the wall to the phone. They are just a source of current and a way to get it to the phone, respectively.Completely draining a Lithium battery, even once, will kill it. (Unlike NiCd and NiMH, which people really would drain completely to prevent "memory effect").The internal charger is "smart" - It will prevent the device from being overcharged, and it will attempt to prevent the device from totally draining the battery by shutting down the device before the battery is fully depleted.When the phone shuts off at 0% it really isn't zero; there's still sufficient charge on the device to prevent the battery from going completely flat. Likewise, 100% is not the maximum the battery can store; it stops charging slightly short of maximum to prevent overcharging.The worst thing you can do is drain the battery to 0%, then not charge it immediately. After it reaches zero and shuts off there's a small amount of energy left, but if you leave it uncharged for long it WILL go flat and kill the battery. So if it reaches zero, charge it soon (within hours). And never leave a phone unused for weeks or months on end without periodically recharging it.You should only use high quality USB power sources to charge your iOS device. They don't have to be Apple's (although Apple makes good ones), but they should never be cheapo USB sources, both because they may damage the phone and they may even injure you.The power source needs to supply at least 1 amp to charge an iPhone, and 2 amps to charge an iPad. Note, however that a power source that can supply more than these values is OK to use; the internal battery charger will take only what it needs. So, for example, you can safely charge your iPhone with an iPad USB adapter.iOS devices fast charge until they reach about 75%; the rate then slows down to prevent overcharging. So it will reach 75% very quickly (under an hour), but it can take a couple of hours more to reach full charge.
So what are the "rules" for charging? The most basic one is charge whenever you want to, for a long as you want to. There's no reason to let the device drain completely before charging (in fact, it's a bad idea to do that on a regular basis), and there's no need to wait until it reaches 100% before removing it from the power source.  You can charge when it's at 40% and disconnect when it reaches 80%, or any other values, without hurting the phone.
The Best Practice, however, is to charge the phone overnight, every night. As it stops automatically at 100% you can't overcharge it doing this. You thus start the day with a fully charged phone. And, if you configure the phone for automatic backup using iTunes or iCloud, the phone will back up every night when it has a WiFi connection and is asleep. Show all
There's a lot of myth and folklore surrounding charging iOS devices (or actually any device that uses Lithium technology batteries). A lot of it comes from the advice given for older technologies, such as Nickel-Cadmium or Nickel-Metal-Hydride batteries. None of this applies to Lithium, however, and some of what we "know" from the NiCd and NiMH days is actually harmful to modern battery technology.
Things to understand:
  1. The "charger" for an iOS device is built into the device. It is not the thingy that plugs into the wall, and it is not the cable that connects the thingy that plugs into the wall to the phone. They are just a source of current and a way to get it to the phone, respectively.
  2. Completely draining a Lithium battery, even once, will kill it. (Unlike NiCd and NiMH, which people really would drain completely to prevent "memory effect").
  3. The internal charger is "smart" - It will prevent the device from being overcharged, and it will attempt to prevent the device from totally draining the battery by shutting down the device before the battery is fully depleted.
  4. When the phone shuts off at 0% it really isn't zero; there's still sufficient charge on the device to prevent the battery from going completely flat. Likewise, 100% is not the maximum the battery can store; it stops charging slightly short of maximum to prevent overcharging.
  5. The worst thing you can do is drain the battery to 0%, then not charge it immediately. After it reaches zero and shuts off there's a small amount of energy left, but if you leave it uncharged for long it WILL go flat and kill the battery. So if it reaches zero, charge it soon (within hours). And never leave a phone unused for weeks or months on end without periodically recharging it.
  6. You should only use high quality USB power sources to charge your iOS device. They don't have to be Apple's (although Apple makes good ones), but they should never be cheapo USB sources, both because they may damage the phone and they may even injure you.
  7. The power source needs to supply at least 1 amp to charge an iPhone, and 2 amps to charge an iPad. Note, however that a power source that can supply more than these values is OK to use; the internal battery charger will take only what it needs. So, for example, you can safely charge your iPhone with an iPad USB adapter.
  8. iOS devices fast charge until they reach about 75%; the rate then slows down to prevent overcharging. So it will reach 75% very quickly (under an hour), but it can take a couple of hours more to reach full charge.

So what are the "rules" for charging? The most basic one is charge whenever you want to, for a long as you want to. There's no reason to let the device drain completely before charging (in fact, it's a bad idea to do that on a regular basis), and there's no need to wait until it reaches 100% before removing it from the power source.  You can charge when it's at 40% and disconnect when it reaches 80%, or any other values, without hurting the phone.
The Best Practice, however, is to charge the phone overnight, every night. As it stops automatically at 100% you can't overcharge it doing this. You thus start the day with a fully charged phone. And, if you configure the phone for automatic backup using iTunes or iCloud, the phone will back up every night when it has a WiFi connection and is asleep.

Why my iphone 6 screen freezes frequently?

iPhonehowapple Replyed • 2 subscribed • 1 replies • 1477 views • 2016-05-09 00:46 • May belong to these tags

How to take a screenshot on your Mac?

iMachowapple Published the article • 0 comments • 487 views • 2016-05-08 13:27 • May belong to these tags

You can take screenshots of your whole screen or just part of it. Screenshots are saved automatically as .png files on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of your whole screen

Press Command (⌘)-Shift-3.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of part of your screen
Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.Move the crosshair pointer to where you want to start the screenshot.Drag to select an area. While dragging, you can hold the Shift key, Option key, or Space bar to change the way the selection moves.When you've selected the area you want, release your mouse or trackpad button. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you release the button.Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of a window

Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
Press the Space bar. The pointer changes to a camera pointer.
Move the camera pointer over a window to highlight it.
Click your mouse or trackpad. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you click.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

This works with Finder windows and most application windows.

Take a screenshot of a menu

Click the menu to reveal its contents.
Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
Drag to select the menu.
Release your mouse or trackpad button. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you release the button.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of a menu without the title

Click the menu to reveal its contents.
Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
Press the Space bar. The pointer changes to a camera pointer.
Move the camera pointer over the menu to highlight it.
Click your mouse or trackpad. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you click.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Learn more

Screenshots are saved as .png files on the desktop in Mac OS X v10.6 and later. They're automatically named "Screen Shot date at time.png."
To save your screenshot to the Clipboard instead of a file on your desktop, use Command-Shift-Control-4.
You can open screenshots with Preview or other image-editing apps.
Some apps, such as DVD Player, might not let you take screenshots of their windows. Show all
You can take screenshots of your whole screen or just part of it. Screenshots are saved automatically as .png files on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of your whole screen

Press Command (⌘)-Shift-3.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of part of your screen
  1. Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
  2. Move the crosshair pointer to where you want to start the screenshot.
  3. Drag to select an area. While dragging, you can hold the Shift key, Option key, or Space bar to change the way the selection moves.
  4. When you've selected the area you want, release your mouse or trackpad button. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you release the button.
  5. Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.


Take a screenshot of a window

Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
Press the Space bar. The pointer changes to a camera pointer.
Move the camera pointer over a window to highlight it.
Click your mouse or trackpad. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you click.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

This works with Finder windows and most application windows.

Take a screenshot of a menu

Click the menu to reveal its contents.
Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
Drag to select the menu.
Release your mouse or trackpad button. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you release the button.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Take a screenshot of a menu without the title

Click the menu to reveal its contents.
Press Command-Shift-4. The pointer changes to a crosshair pointer.
Press the Space bar. The pointer changes to a camera pointer.
Move the camera pointer over the menu to highlight it.
Click your mouse or trackpad. To cancel, press the Escape (esc) key before you click.
Find the screenshot as a .png file on your desktop.

Learn more

Screenshots are saved as .png files on the desktop in Mac OS X v10.6 and later. They're automatically named "Screen Shot date at time.png."
To save your screenshot to the Clipboard instead of a file on your desktop, use Command-Shift-Control-4.
You can open screenshots with Preview or other image-editing apps.
Some apps, such as DVD Player, might not let you take screenshots of their windows.

How to edit a Blueprint in Configurator 2?

Reply

iPadadmin Post a question • 1 subscribed • 0 replies • 1009 views • 2016-05-07 12:59 • May belong to these tags